Blog Post

Today I’m building a guitar foot stool. I play the guitar and have always wanted to use a foot stool but never bought one. That’s fine with me, because now I get to build one!

I still have a bunch of red oak in the shop so I rummaged around until I found a couple scraps I could use.

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I made sure that the scrap was big enough to fit my templates, and then trimmed them down with some scissors. I marked a line so I could cut the scrap down to size.

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I made this cut on the band saw. It didn’t need to be accurate, I just wanted the chunk to be more manageable.

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I applied some glue-stick to the back of the templates and placed them on the wood. It sticks long enough to get the job done, and then sands off easily.

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Back at the band saw, I followed as closely as I could to the lines without touching them. It’s kind of like coloring inside the lines, its really easy if you take your time. The only sharp blade I had was fairly wide so it doesn’t cut very tight corners. I just made several passes to get close to the line on the curves.

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At this point I thought I needed to have extra chunky legs, so I offset the line from the middle.

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After cutting the legs down, I realized they could be much thinner.

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I used the planer to bring all four pieces down to the same thickness.

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Using some double sided tape, I stuck the two like sides together. This means I could shape them at the same time to make them identical.

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I used the disc sander to round the corners smooth, right up to the line.

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Once the shaping was done, I ripped the pieces apart.

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The stool basically consists of 4 legs and one body. I ripped this chunk of oak down to its final width. I made a cut about a quarter inch wider than I needed, and then flipped it over and cut it right on.

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Over on the miter saw, it cut one end flat, then flipped it and cut it to final length.

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The piece was a little too thick, so I used the planer to thin it down.

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Referencing my model, I used a combination square to draw out the exact sections I needed to remove. It would leave essentially a wing on each side.

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I swapped my normal blade for a dado stack and lined up the cut. I crept up to the line before making the entire pass. It’s not very safe to cut without an insert, but I didn’t have one. I have since bought one and I feel much more comfortable using the dado blades.

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I had to cut a notch to allow enough room for the two closest legs to be able to swing. I measured out the dimensions with the ruler and then connected the lines.

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I removed the bulk of the material with the band saw.

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I used a razor knife to establish the line, and then used a chisel to break the edge.

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Now, using a small saw, I cut down close to the bottom and then chipped out the wood with the chisel.

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I used a couple different chisels and then a shoulder plane to flatten the surface down to match the rest of the side.

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I also used the plane to flatten the angle I just cut.

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Then I repeated the exact same process on the other side.

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I found a bottle cap that was the perfect size to round over the front of the stool. I marked it out on both sides with a pencil.

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I could now rough cut around nose, but not actually touch the line.

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The belt sander removed the left over material in a hurry.

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You can see how easy it is to sand down right to the line.

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Now I marked out the notches to make the stool adjustable.

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I continued the lines over the edge, marking the back of the notches and then measured over to mark the backs.

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Then I connected the lines which created a wedge shape.

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Cutting these was a little tricky. You have to make sure to keep the piece perfectly vertical so the notches don’t come out crooked.

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I used a small, quarter inch, chisel to break out the wedges and then to clean up the valleys.

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I used a long file to smooth everything out and finish removing material up to the lines.

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I used the same file to round over the edges on the angle.

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In order for the legs to pivot, I needed a hole right through rounded nose. I used a compass to find the center.

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So the bit wouldn’t wander, I punched a hole right in the center.

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I used a clamp to keep the block vertical while drilling the hole. It’s important this hole is dead strait.

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To mark the hole locations on the legs, I chucked up the brass rod, that I would later cut as the axels, to the drill and spun it until it left a mark.

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Now I knew exactly where to drill the next hole.

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I also drilled the holes in the center of the outside legs.

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And here you can see what the stool will look like folded up.

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My Project Tools

BAND SAW

THICKNESS PLANER

DISC SANDER

TABLE SAW

MITER SAW

COMBINATION SQUARE

DADO BLADES

SHOULDER PLANE

BASTARD FILE

COMPASS

DRILL PRESS

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